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Richmond, Kentucky

Richmond, Kentucky
City
Madison County courthouse, Richmond, with flags at half-staff in honor of Veterans Day (2007).
Madison County courthouse, Richmond, with flags at half-staff in honor of Veterans Day (2007).
Nickname(s): Home Of Kentucky's Finest
Motto: "The City That Works"
Location of Richmond, Kentucky
Location of Richmond, Kentucky
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Kentucky
County Madison
Government
 • Type City Mayor/Manager
 • Mayor Jim Barnes
 • Manager Richard Thomas
Area
 • Total 19.3 sq mi (49.9 km2)
 • Land 19.1 sq mi (49.5 km2)
 • Water 0.1 sq mi (0.4 km2)
Elevation 948 ft (289 m)
Population (2013)
 • Total 32,550
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 40475-40476
Area code(s) 859
FIPS code 21-65226
GNIS feature ID 0501827
Website richmond.ky.us

Richmond is a city in and the county seat of Madison County, Kentucky, United States.[1] It is named after Richmond, Virginia, and is the home of Eastern Kentucky University. The population was 32,550 in 2013.[2] Richmond is the third-largest city in the Bluegrass region (after Louisville and Lexington), the state's seventh-largest city (after Louisville, Lexington, Bowling Green, Owensboro, Covington, and Hopkinsville), and the largest city between Lexington and Knoxville located along Interstate 75. Richmond serves as the center for work and shopping for south-central Kentucky. Richmond is the principal city of the Richmond–Berea Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Madison and Rockcastle counties.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Geography 2
    • Climate 2.1
  • Demographics 3
  • Government 4
  • Education 5
    • High schools 5.1
    • Post-secondary education 5.2
  • Media 6
    • Newspaper 6.1
    • Radio stations 6.2
  • Infrastructure 7
  • Cityscape 8
  • Notable people 9
  • See also 10
  • References 11
  • External links 12

History

The City of Richmond was founded in 1798 by Colonel John Miller from Virginia, a British American who had served with the rebels in the Revolutionary War. According to tradition, Miller was attracted to the area by the good spring water and friendly Native Americans. That year, the Kentucky legislature approved moving the county seat from Milford to land owned by Colonel Miller. The residents of Milford adamantly opposed the move, which led to a fist fight between Dave Kennedy (representing Milford) and William Kearly (representing Richmond). The county approved the move in March 1798. On July 4, 1798, the new town was named Richmond in honor of Miller's Virginia birthplace.[3] Richmond was incorporated in 1809.[4]

Kentucky was a border state during the Civil War and stayed in the Union. On August 30, 1862, during the Civil War, the Union and Confederate Armies clashed in the Battle of Richmond. Troops under Confederate General Edmund Kirby Smith routed the soldiers of Union General William Nelson. Out of Nelson's 6,500 men, only 1,200 escaped; the rest were all captured.[5] One historian called this battle "the nearest thing to a Cannae ever scored by any general, North or South, in the course of the whole war." [6]

In 1906, Eastern Kentucky State Normal School was founded in Richmond to train teachers. There were eleven members of the first graduating class in 1909. By 1922 it had expanded its curriculum to a four-year program and was established as a college. It added graduate-degree programs in 1935. In recognition of its academic departments and research, in 1965 the institution was renamed as Eastern Kentucky University.[7]

In the late 1990s and through the first decade of the 21st century, Richmond had a commercial and residential boom related to other development in the Bluegrass Region. As of 2009, Richmond was Kentucky's seventh-largest city, moving up four places from ranking in the 2000 census as Kentucky's eleventh-largest city.[8]

Geography

Richmond is located at (37.744720, -84.293562).[9]

Richmond is situated among the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. The Kentucky River comprises the northern border of Madison County.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 19.2 square miles (50 km2), of which 19.1 square miles (49 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2)(0.73%) is water.

Climate

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Richmond has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[10] Average Annual Rainfall is 45", which is spread fairly evenly throughout the year. Relative humidity % at Noon is in the upper 50%'s from April through October, and in the mid 70%'s at Noon November through February. The Average daily temperature is 36.6 Fahrenheit in January and 77.0 Fahrenheit in July. Maximum observed temperature on record is 108 Fahrenheit, and the minimum observed temperature is -24 Fahrenheit.

Demographics

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 27,152 people, 10,795 households, and 5,548 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,420.4 people per square mile (548.3/km²). There were 11,857 housing units at an average density of 620.3/sq mi (239.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 88.30% White, 8.27% African American, 0.29% Native American, 1.09% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.43% from other races, and 1.58% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.21% of the population.

There were 10,795 households out of which 24.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 35.2% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 48.6% were non-families. 34.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.14 and the average family size was 2.78.

In the city the population was spread out with 17.5% under the age of 18, 31.7% from 18 to 24, 27.5% from 25 to 44, 13.8% from 45 to 64, and 9.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 25 years. For every 100 females there were 90.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $25,533, and the median income for a family was $36,222. Males had a median income of $30,817 versus $22,053 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,815. About 16.6% of families and 25.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.2% of those under age 18 and 19.9% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Richmond operates under a council–manager government. The citizens elect a mayor and four city commissioners who form the Board of Commissioners. The Board of Commissioners is the legislative body of the city government and represents the interests of the citizens when applicable. The Board of Commissioners appoints a city manager, who administers the day-to-day operations of the city.

The mayor is elected for a term of four years. Each city commissioner is elected for a term of two years. The term of the city manager is indefinite.

Education

Richmond is served by the Madison County Public School System.[14]

High schools

Post-secondary education

Media

Newspaper

The Richmond Register is published on Tuesday and Saturday publication. The Eastern Progress is a weekly student publication of Eastern Kentucky University[15]

Radio stations

Infrastructure

Cityscape

The city has numerous parks, the most prominent being Lake Reba Recreational Complex. Paradise Cove, the city's aquatic center, is located in the complex, along with Adventure Falls Miniature Golf and Batting Cages, separate regulation sports fields for football, soccer, baseball and softball; a horse shoe pit, and a playground.

view of Lake Reba in Richmond, Kentucky from the fishing dock.

The downtown business district includes many Victorian-style structures including the Glyndon Hotel.

The majority of the city's high rises are located on the campus of Eastern Kentucky University (EKU), which include the 20-story Commonwealth Hall, the 16-story Keene Hall, the 13-story Telford Hall, and two 12-story buildings, Todd and Dupree halls.

The 2,000-seat EKU Center for the Arts was completed in 2011 on Lancaster Avenue.

Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  2. ^ "American FactFinder".  
  3. ^ Chamber of Commerce website, "City History", retrieved August 28, 2009.
  4. ^ Collins, Lewis (1877). History of Kentucky. p. 493. 
  5. ^ The History Channel website. "This Day in History: August 30, 1862- The Battle of Richmond, Kentucky," retrieved August 28, 2009.
  6. ^ Foote, Shelby, The Civil War, A Narrative: Fort Sumter to Perryville, Random House, 1958, ISBN 0-394-49517-9
  7. ^ Eastern Kentucky University website, "About Eastern Kentucky University", retrieved August 28, 2009
  8. ^ US Census, "Kentucky by Place", retrieved July 28, 2010
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  10. ^ Climate Summary for Richmond, Kentucky
  11. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  12. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  13. ^ "American FactFinder".  
  14. ^ Madison County Schools website, retrieved August 28,2 009.
  15. ^ "Eastern Kentucky University". The Eastern Progress. 2012-04-26. Retrieved 2012-05-15. 

External links

  • City of Richmond
  •  
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