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Shah Rukh of Persia

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Title: Shah Rukh of Persia  
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Subject: Ahmad Shah Durrani, Durrani Empire, 1748, Mohammad Khan Qajar, Karim Khan, Zand dynasty, Shahrokh, Hatef Esfehani, Durrani dynasty, Ebrahim Afshar
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Shah Rukh of Persia

Shahrukh Shah Afshar, also spelled Shahrokh (Persian: شاهرخ‎) (c. 1730–1796) was a king of the Afsharid dynasty and a contemporary of the Zand kings.[1]

As the teenage son of Reza Gholi Mirza and Nader Shah's grandson, he was elected by the nobles following the assassination of Ebrahim Afshar. His fourth son, Nadir Mirza of Khorasan, became the prince of Khorasan. He made Mashhad the capital of his kingdom. Shahrukh was a contemporary of Mirza Mohammad, who was the son of shah Suleiman I Safavi's daughter and a clergyman.[2] Encouraged by the nobles, he came to believe he was the true heir to the throne. Thus he captured and blinded Shahrukh capitalizing on the popular dissatisfaction with Shahrukh's rule, partly owing to the conduct of his Georgian favorite Rasul Beg, who scandalized Mashad by making free with the harem of his master.[3] In 1749, during a struggle for power, the son of the Khan of Tabriz, Azad Khan Afghan, began a campaign for independence which removed the province of Atropatene from the Persian empire, while in the west the Qajar tribe led by Mohammad Hassan Khan took over the region of Mazandaran.

In 1750, Soleyman II was captured and blinded by the followers of Shahrukh, subsequent to which Shahrukh was reinstated as Shah.

In 1760, when Karim Khan took control of Persia, he did not try to depose Shahrukh out of respect for Nader, however, the realm of Shahrukh was reduced to the province of Khorasan.

In 1796, Agha Muhammad Khan conquered Khorasan and had Shahrukh tortured to death because he thought that he knew of Nadir's treasures. Shahrukh's descendants in the male line continue today under the Afshar Naderi surname.

Preceded by
Ebrahim Shah Afshar
Shah of Persia (1st time)
1748–1749
Succeeded by
Suleiman II of Persia
Preceded by
Suleiman II of Persia
Shah of Persia (2nd time)
1750–1760
Succeeded by
Karim Khan Zand
Preceded by
Ebrahim Shah Afshar
Atropates (as part of Persia)
1748–1749
Succeeded by
Azad Khan Afghan
Preceded by
Ebrahim Shah Afshar
Ruler of Mazandaran (as part of Persia)
1748–1749
Succeeded by
Mohammad Hasan Khan Qajar
Preceded by
Soleyman III Safavi
Ruler of Khorasan
1750–1796
Succeeded by
Agha Mohammad Khan Qajar

References

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