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Ship burial

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Title: Ship burial  
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Subject: Port an Eilean Mhòir boat burial, Scar boat burial, Sutton Hoo, Varangians, Rus' Khaganate
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Ship burial

Model of the Sutton Hoo ship's structure as it might have appeared, with chamber area outlined

A ship burial or boat grave is a burial in which a ship or boat is used either as a container for the dead and the grave goods, or as a part of the grave goods itself. If the ship is very small, it is called a boat grave. This style of burial was used among the Germanic peoples, particularly by Viking Age Norsemen, but has been practised in Scandinavia since at last the earliest Iron Age, as evidenced by the Hjortspring boat grave and the Nydam Mose ships.

A unique eye-witness account of a 10th-century ship burial among the Volga Vikings is given by Arab traveller Ibn Fadlan.[1]

Viking Age ship burials

Scandinavia

British Isles

Viking/Norse burial

Anglo-Saxon

Northern Europe

Eastern Europe

See also

Media related to at Wikimedia Commons

References

  1. ^ Ibn Fadlan and the Land of Darkness: Arab Travellers in the Far North (Penguin Classics 2012, ISBN 9780140455076), Introduction by Paul Lunde and Caroline Stone, pp. xxiii-xxiv.
  2. ^ The Viking Ship Museum in Roskilde
  3. ^ Gokstadhaugen - Artificial Mound in Norway
  4. ^ Osebergskipet - The Oseberg Ship, Norway
  5. ^ Viking Ship Museum at Bygdøy
  6. ^ Anundshög, Stoneship
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^
  10. ^
  11. ^ Vikings on Mann
  12. ^
  13. ^ The Scar Viking Boat Burial
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