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Shipra River

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Title: Shipra River  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Ancient monuments in Ujjain, Geography of Malwa, Kal Bhairav temple, Ujjain, Rivers of Madhya Pradesh, Sunar River
Collection: Geography of Malwa, Rivers of Madhya Pradesh
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Shipra River

The Shri Ram Ghat on the Shipra River in Ujjain
A puja performed on the banks of the overflowing Shipra River in Ujjain during the summer monsoon.

The Shipra, also known as the Kshipra, is a river in Madhya Pradesh state of central India. The river rises in the kakri bardi hills Vindhya Range north of Dhar, and flows north across the Malwa Plateau to join the Chambal River. It is one of the sacred rivers in Hinduism. The holy city of Ujjain is situated on its right bank. Every 12 years, the Kumbh Mela festival takes place on the city's elaborate riverside ghats, as do yearly celebrations of the river goddess Kshipra.There are hundreds of Hindu shrines along the banks of the river Shipra. Shipra is a perennial river. Earlier there used to be plenty of water in the river. Now the river stops flowing a couple of months after the monsoon.

With this reference, the word Shipra is used as a symbol of "purity" (of soul, emotions, body, etc.) or "chastity" or "clarity". ujjain is in malwa region.Legend has it that once Lord Shiva went begging for alms, using the skull of Lord Brahma as the begging bowl. Nowhere in the three worlds did he manage to get any alms. Ultimately, he went to Vaikunth, or the abode of Lord Vishnu, and asked Lord Vishnu for alms. In return, Lord Vishnu showed Lord Shiva his index finger, which enraged the latter. Lord Shiva took out his trishul, or trident, and cut Lord Vishnu’s fingers. The Preserver’s fingers began to bleed profusely, and the blood accumulated in Brahma’s skull and soon overflowed from it. The flow became a stream

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