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Somniloquy

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Title: Somniloquy  
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Somniloquy

Somniloquy or sleep-talking is a parasomnia that refers to talking aloud while asleep. It can be quite loud, ranging from simple mumbling sounds to loud shouts and long frequently inarticulate speeches, and can occur many times during a sleep cycle.[1] As with sleepwalking and night terrors, sleeptalking usually occurs during the less-deep delta-wave NREM sleep stages or during temporary arousals therefrom.

It can also occur during the deeper REM sleep stage, at which time it represents what sleep therapists call a motor breakthrough (see sleep paralysis) of dream speech: words spoken in a dream are spoken out loud. Depending on its frequency, this may or may not be considered pathological. All motor functions are typically disabled during REM sleep; thus, motoric, i.e., verbal elaboration of dream content, could be considered an REM behavior disorder (see below).

Sleep-talking can occur by itself or as a feature of another sleep disorder such as:

Sleep-talking is very common and is reported in 50% of young children, with most of them outgrowing it by puberty, although in rare cases it may persist into adulthood (about 4% of adults are reported to talk in their sleep). It appears to run in families. In 1966, researchers worked to find links between heredity and Somniloquy. Their research suggests the following:[2]

  • Sleep-talking parents are more likely to have children who sleep-talk
  • Sleep talking can still occur, though much less commonly, when neither parent has a history of sleep talking
  • A large portion of parents begin to sleep-talk later in life without any prior history of sleep-talking during childhood or adolescence

Sleep-talking by itself is typically harmless; however, it can wake others and cause them consternation—especially when misinterpreted as conscious speech by an observer. If the sleep-talking is dramatic, emotional, or profane it may be a sign of another sleep disorder (see above). Sleep-talking can be monitored by a partner or by using an audio recording device; devices which remain idle until detecting a sound wave are ideal for this purpose. Polysomnography (sleep recording) shows episodes of sleep talking that can occur in any stage of sleep.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/talking-in-your-sleep Talking in Your Sleep
  2. ^ Arkin, Arthur M. (1981). Sleep Talking Psychology and Psychophysiology. L. Erlbaum Associates. pp. 40–41.  

External links

  • OSF Healthcare
  • The Sleep Well
  • Somniloquies in the form of albums and books by Bryan Lewis Saunders
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