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South Korean literature

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Title: South Korean literature  
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South Korean literature

See also Culture of South Korea, Korean literature till 1948, and North Korean literature

South Korean literature covers literature from South Korea, written mainly in Korean, and/or other languages.

Contents

  • Literature by genre 1
    • Novels 1.1
      • See also 1.1.1
    • Mass market fiction 1.2
    • Essayists 1.3
    • Poetry 1.4
    • Drama 1.5
  • References 2

Literature by genre

Novels

A representative barometer of serious fiction is provided by the choices of some contemporary authors by the Korea Literature Translation Institute for translation into English, French, German and Spanish. Among the modern authors translated by LTI are:

See also

Korean-American writers writing in Korean, e.g. Kim Yong-ik

Mass market fiction

The Korea literature market is dominated by typical mass market genres, including:

Popular novels: e.g. Jo Jung-rae (b. 1943), Lee Oisoo, Park Min-gyu, Internet novelist Guiyeoni, actor Cha In-pyo
The detective novel: e.g. Kim Ho-su (김호수) Den Haag.
Political fiction: e.g. Kim Jin-myung (김진명)'s The Rose of Sharon Blooms Again and film.
Fantasy fiction: e.g. Lee Yeongdo (b. 1972), Jeon Min-hee's Children of the rune, Lee Woo-hyouk's The Soul Guardians (퇴마록, 退魔錄), etc.
Science fiction & boundary literature: Bae Myung Hoon (배명훈), Kim Ie-hwan (김이환), Djuna. etc

Essayists

Non-fiction essayists include Chang Young-hee.

Poetry

List of Korean language poets (mainly 20th Century)

Notable modern poets include Moon Deok-soo (문덕수, 文德守, b.1928),[2] Choi Nam-son (1890–1957) [3] and Kim Sowol,[4] Ki Hyung-do, Chon Sang-pyong.

Drama

This article does not cover Japanese language writers with South Korean citizenship such as Miri Yu.

References

  1. ^ English translation by Agnita Tennant, pb Kegan Paul.
  2. ^ 1985 The Anthology of Modern Korean Poetry (한국현대시선) Chung Chong-Wha et al. East West
  3. ^ 1997 Modern Korean Verse (한국 현대 시조선) Kim Jaihiun Ronsdale LTI Korea
  4. ^ 2004 The Columbia Anthology of Modern Korean Poetry (한국현대시선집) David R.McCann Columbia University Press
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