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Structural cohesion

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Title: Structural cohesion  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Structural endogamy, History of sociology, Community cohesion, Network analysis, Asabiyyah
Collection: Graph Connectivity, Network Analysis, Social Networks, Sociological Terminology
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Structural cohesion

Structural cohesion is the sociological conception [1][2] of a useful formal definition and measure of cohesion in social groups. It is defined as the minimal number of actors in a social network that need to be removed to disconnect the group. It is thus identical to the question of the node connectivity of a given graph. The vertex-cut version of Menger's theorem also proves that the disconnection number is equivalent to a maximally sized group with a network in which every pair of persons has at least this number of separate paths between them. It is also useful to know that k-cohesive graphs (or k-components) are always a subgraph of a k-core, although a k-core is not always k-cohesive. A k-core is simply a subgraph in which all nodes have at least k neighbors but it need not even be connected. The boundaries of structural endogamy in a kinship group are a special case of structural cohesion.

Contents

  • Software 1
  • Examples 2
  • Perceived cohesion 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5

Software

Cohesive.blocking is the R program for computing structural cohesion according to the Moody-White (2003) algorithm. This wiki site provides numerous examples and a tutorial for use with R.

Examples

Some illustrative examples are presented in the gallery below:

Perceived cohesion

Perceived Cohesion Scale (PCS) is a six item scale that is used to measure structural cohesion in groups. In 1990, Bollen and Hoyle used the PCS and applied it to a study of large groups which were used to assess the psychometric qualities of their scale.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^  
  2. ^  
  3. ^ Chin, Wynne W., et al. Perceived Cohesion: A Conceptual and Empirical Examination: Adapting and Testing the Perceived Cohesion Scale in a Small-Group Setting. 1999. Small Group Research 30(6):751-766.
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