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Swelling (medical)

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Title: Swelling (medical)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Osteochondritis dissecans, List of ICD-9 codes 780–799: symptoms, signs, and ill-defined conditions, Swelling, Anti-inflammatory, Ischemic cell death
Collection: Medical Signs
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Swelling (medical)

Swelling
Left and right ring fingers of the same individual. The distal phalanx of the finger on the right exhibits swelling due to acute paronychia.
Classification and external resources
ICD-10 R22
ICD-9-CM 782.2, 784.2, 786.6, 789.3
MedlinePlus 003103

In

  1. ^ "Swelling". Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary (31st ed.).  
  2. ^ a b "Swelling".  

References

See also

While it is possible for mild swelling to go away on its own, several things can be done to relieve the symptoms or hasten the process. It is important that swelling is treated quickly because it occurs at the fastest rate once immediately after the incident. The RICE first aid method of rest, ice, compression, and elevation protecting the affected area has long been taught as a short term solution. The application of oxygen is known to assist in the reduction of swelling.

Treatment

Some possible causes of a swollen limb include:

Causes of generalized swelling:

Causes

lymph nodes will be affected and will show signs of acute lymphadenitis. Chronic inflammatory swellings will show the signs of acute inflammatory swellings, but in subdued form. In this case, edema might not occur. Chronic swellings can be differentiated from neoplastic swellings by the fact that neoplastic swellings never recede in size, but inflammatory swellings may show occasional diminution.

Congenital swellings are present since birth, such as a hemangioma or meningocele. Some congenital swellings may not be discovered until later in life, such as a branchial cyst, dermoid cyst or thyroglossal cyst.

Traumatic swellings develop immediately after trauma, like a hematoma or dislocation.

Types of swelling

Contents

  • Types of swelling 1
  • Causes 2
  • Treatment 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5

Generalized swelling, or massive edema (also called anasarca), is a common sign in severely ill people. Although slight edema may be difficult to detect to the untrained eye, especially in an overweight person, massive edema is very obvious.

A body part may swell in response to injury, infection, or disease. Swelling, especially of the ankle, can occur if the body is not circulating fluid well.

In a general sense, the suffix "-megaly" is used to indicate a growth, as in hepatomegaly, acromegaly, and splenomegaly.

Swelling is considered one of the five characteristics of inflammation; along with pain, heat, redness, and loss of function.

[2]

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