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Synchronoptic view

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Title: Synchronoptic view  
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Subject: Timeline, Chronology, History, List of timelines, Timelines
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Synchronoptic view

A synchronoptic view is a graphic display of a number of entities as they proceed through time. A synchronoptic view can be used for many purposes but is best suited to the visual display of history. A number of related timelines can be drawn on a single chart showing which events and lives are contemporary and which are unconnected.

A synchronoptic view has important educational advantages. Visible information is much more easily learned, than when it is presented only in pure text form. History is an ideal subject for a synchronoptic view. Multiple timelines are able to show how events interacted. Multiple lifelines can show which people were contemporaries. (See example)

A combination of maps is also synchronoptic when it displays successive moments in time.

Contents

  • Etymology 1
  • Carte chronographique 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Etymology

The concept in question is made visual — hence optic. The elements are displayed synchronously: i.e. which events in one area happened at the same time as events in another seemingly unrelated area. Thus synchron-optic.

Synchronoptic also means visible at the same time", or "with parallel views". i.e. The user gets a view of all the information in one go.

Carte chronographique

Carte chronographique (1753)

Jacques Barbeu-Dubourg (1709–1779) was the first to develop a synchronoptical visualisation with his Chronographie universelle & details qui en dependent pour la Chronologie & les Genealogies (1753) abbreviated to Carte chronographique.[1] The chronographic chart consisted of 35 prints which were designed to be stuck together in a row, enabling 6,500 years to be represented in 6.5 meters.[1] The horizontal axis representing the passage of time was consistent throughout, but the vertical axis was varied depending on the categories Barbeu-Dubourg considered relevant for that period of history.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c Schmidt-Burkhardt, Astrit. "Learning in the Age of Enlightenment". http://georgemaciunas.com/. George Maciunas Foundation Inc. Retrieved 10 October 2015. 

External links

  • Hyper History Online. A good example of a synchronoptic view of history


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