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Trevor Pinch

Trevor J. Pinch (born 1952) is a British sociologist, part-time musician and former chair of the Science and Technology Studies department at Cornell University.

Pinch has a degree in Physics from the Imperial College London and a PhD in Sociology from the University of Bath. He taught sociology at the University of York before moving to the USA.

Together with Wiebe Bijker he started the movement known as Social Construction of Technology (SCOT) within the sociology of science.

He is a significant contributor to the study of Sound culture, and his books include a major study of Robert Moog.

Trevor Pinch's book, Confronting Nature is widely considered the definitive sociological account of the history of the solar neutrino problem, and was mentioned by Raymond Davis in his 2002 Nobel Prize acceptance speech [1]

Works

  • Bijker, W. E., Hughes, T. P., & Pinch, T. J. (Eds.). (1989 (1987)). The Social Construction of Technological Systems: New Directions in the Sociology and History of Technology. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press.
  • Collins, H. M., & Pinch, T. J. (1993). The Golem: What You Should Know about Science. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.
  • Collins, H. M., & Pinch, T. J. (1998). The Golem at Large: What You Should Know about Technology. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.
  • Kline, R., & Pinch, T. J. (1996). Taking the Black Box off its Wheels: The Social Construction of the Automobile in Rural America. Technology and Culture, 37, 776 - 795.
  • Kline, R., & Pinch, T. J. (1999 (1985)). The Social Construction of Technology. In D. MacKenzie & J. Wajcman (Eds.), The Social Shaping of Technology (2nd ed., pp. 113 – 115). Buckingham: Open University Press.
  • Pinch, T. J. (1996). The Social Construction of Technology: a Review. In R. Fox (Ed.), Technological Change; Methods and Themes in the History of Technology (pp. 17 – 35). Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers.
  • Pinch, T. J. (2001). Why Do You go to a Piano Store to Buy a Synthesizer: Path Dependence and the Social Construction of Technology. In R. Garud & P. Karnøe (Eds.), Path Dependence and Creation (pp. 381 – 399). Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum and Associates Publishers.
  • Pinch, T. J., Ashmore, M., & Mulkay, M. (1992). Technology, Testing, Text: Clinical Budgeting in the U.K. National Health Service. In W. E. Bijker & J. Law (Eds.), Shaping technology/building society: studies in sociotechnical change (pp. 265 – 289). Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press.
  • Pinch, T. J., & Bijker, W. E. (1984). The Social Construction of Facts and Artefacts: or How the Sociology of Science and the Sociology of Technology might Benefit Each Other. Social Studies of Science, 14, 388 - 441.
  • Pinch, T. J., & Bijker, W. E. (1986). Science, Relativism and the New Sociology of Technology: Reply to Russell. Social Studies of Science, 16, 347 - 260.
  • Pinch, T. J., & Bijker, W. E. (1989 (1987)). The Social Construction of Facts and Artifacts: Or How the Sociology of Science and the Sociology of Technology Might Benefit Each Other. In W. E. Bijker, T. P. Hughes & T. J. Pinch (Eds.), The Social Construction of Technological Systems: New Directions in the Sociology and History of Technology (pp. 17 – 50). Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press.
  • Pinch, T. J., & Trocco, Frank (2002). Analog Days: The Invention and Impact of the Moog Synthesizer. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. hardcover: ISBN 0-674-00889-8, 2004 paperback: ISBN 0-674-01617-3

External links

  • Trevor Pinch at Cornell (1)
  • Trevor Pinch at Cornell (2)
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