Two Million Minutes

"2 Million Minutes" is a series of documentary films exploring how students in the United States, India, and the People’s Republic of China spend the nominal 2,000,000 minutes of their high school years.[1] The film has been supported by Newt Gingrich and Al Sharpton.[2]

Contents

  • Chapters 1
    • Chapter 1: 2 Million Minutes: A Global Examination 1.1
    • Chapter 2: 2 Million Minutes: In India 1.2
    • Chapter 3: 2 Million Minutes: In China 1.3
    • Chapter 4: 2 Million Minutes: The 21st Century Solution 1.4
  • References 2

Chapters

As of 2009, four chapters have been produced.

Chapter 1: 2 Million Minutes: A Global Examination

Chapter 1 describes the different emphasis students, parents, and teachers put on socialization, academic rigor, and discipline in the three countries. This chapter of the film compares high school students from three countries, India, China and the United States. The film seems to focus on stereotypes of the study habits and social behaviors of students from these different countries. For example, the story looks at how American students natural proclivity to extra-curricular activities like student government and sports teams versus Chinese and Indian students' dedication to additional prep work and hobbies like playing instruments.

Chapter 2: 2 Million Minutes: In India

Chapter 2 describes the Indian K-12 education system. Filmed one year after Chapter 1, it rejoins the two American students and the two Indian students for a discussion. The film also features an interview with the principal of St. Paul's English school, Sundari Rao.

Chapter 3: 2 Million Minutes: In China

Chapter 3 describes the Chinese K-12 education system. Filmed one year after Chapter 1, it rejoins the two American students and the two Chinese students for a discussion. The film also features an interview with the headmaster of Xiwai International school, Dr. Lin.

Chapter 4: 2 Million Minutes: The 21st Century Solution

Chapter 4 advocates some solutions for the United States to become competitive in education.

References

  1. ^ Official Website
  2. ^ Newt Gingrich's post about the film
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