World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Virginia Attorney General election, 2013

Article Id: WHEBN0041000480
Reproduction Date:

Title: Virginia Attorney General election, 2013  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Virginia elections, 2013, United States Senate election in Virginia, 2014, Virginia gubernatorial election, 2013, United States elections, 2013, Jennifer Wexton
Collection: Virginia Elections, 2013
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Virginia Attorney General election, 2013

Virginia Attorney General election, 2013

November 5, 2013 (2013-11-05)

 
Nominee Mark Herring Mark Obenshain
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,105,045 1,104,138
Percentage 49.91% 49.87%

Attorney General before election

Ken Cuccinelli
Republican

Elected Attorney General

Mark Herring
Democratic

The Virginia Attorney General election of 2013 took place on November 5, 2013, to elect the Attorney General of Virginia. The incumbent Attorney General, Republican Ken Cuccinelli, did not run for re-election. He was instead his party's nominee in the 2013 gubernatorial election.

On May 18, 2013, a Republican state convention in Richmond nominated State Senator Mark Obenshain over State Delegate Rob Bell.[1] The Democratic primary on June 11, 2013 was won by State Senator Mark Herring, who defeated former Assistant United States Attorney Justin Fairfax.[2]

While the statewide elections for governor and lieutenant governor garnered more national attention, the race for attorney general was the most competitive.[3] Obenshain had an election night lead of 1,200 votes. In the following days, as provisional ballots were counted, Herring narrowed the lead and ultimately overtook him.[4] On November 25, the Virginia State Board of Elections certified the results and Herring was declared the winner by 1,103,777 votes to 1,103,612 - a difference of 165 votes out of more than 2.2 million cast, or 0.007%.[5][6][7]

After the certification, Obenshain requested a recount,[8] which began on December 16.[9] Obenshain conceded the election on December 18, and later that day, the recount ended with Herring winning by 907 votes, or 0.04%.[10] With Herring’s victory, Democrats held all five statewide offices — including both U.S. Senate seats — for the first time since 1970.

Contents

  • Republican nomination 1
    • Candidates 1.1
      • Nominated at convention 1.1.1
      • Defeated at convention 1.1.2
      • Withdrew 1.1.3
  • Democratic primary 2
    • Candidates 2.1
      • Declared 2.1.1
      • Withdrew 2.1.2
      • Declined 2.1.3
    • Polling 2.2
    • Results 2.3
  • General election 3
    • Endorsements 3.1
    • Polling 3.2
    • Initial results 3.3
    • Recount 3.4
    • Results 3.5
  • See also 4
  • References 5

Republican nomination

Candidates

Nominated at convention

Defeated at convention

Withdrew

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared

Withdrew

Declined

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Justin
Fairfax
Mark
Herring
Other Undecided
Public Policy Polling May 24–26, 2013 322 ± 5.5% 19% 22% 59%

Results

Virginia Attorney General Democratic primary, 2013[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Mark Herring 72,861 51.66%
Democratic Justin Fairfax 68,177 48.34%
Majority 4,684 3.32%
Turnout 141,038

General election

Endorsements

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Mark
Obenshain (R)
Mark
Herring (D)
Other Undecided
Public Policy Polling November 2–3, 2013 870 ± 3.3% 45% 47% 8%
Christopher Newport University October 25–30, 2013 1,038 ± 3% 45% 43% 12%
Public Policy Polling October 26–27, 2013 709 EV ± 3.6% 42% 54% 3%
Hampton University October 24, 26–27, 2013 800 ± 2.9% 45% 39% 16%
Washington Post/Abt SRBI October 24–27, 2013 762 ± 4.5% 46% 49% 4%
Roanoke College October 21–27, 2013 838 ± 3.4% 35% 46% 20%
Christopher Newport University October 8–13, 2013 753 ± 3.6% 46% 45% 9%
Watson Center October 1–6, 2013 886 ± 3.1% 42% 45% 14%
Roanoke College September 30–October 5, 2013 1,046 ± 3% 38% 35% 26%
Hampton University September 25–29, 2013 800 ± 2.9% 41% 37% 23%
University of Mary Washington September 25–29, 2013 559 ± 4.7% 42% 36% 6% 16%
Washington Post/Abt SRBI September 19–22, 2013 562 ± 5% 42% 45% 14%
Conquest Communications September 19, 2013 400 ±5% 35.8% 24.5% 39.8%
NBC/Marist September 17–19, 2013 546 ± 3% 34% 39% 26%
Roanoke College September 9–15, 2013 874 ± 3.3% 31% 33% 34%
Public Policy Polling July 11–14, 2013 601 ± 4% 36% 38% 25%
Roanoke College July 8–14, 2013 525 ± 4.3% 33% 29% 38%
Public Policy Polling May 24–26, 2013 672 ± 3.8% 32% 33% 34%

Initial results

Virginia Attorney General election, 2013[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Mark Herring 1,103,777 49.89% +7.60%
Republican Mark Obenshain 1,103,612 49.88% -7.63%
Write-ins 4,892 0.22% +0.13%
Majority 165 0.01%
Turnout 2,212,281
Democratic gain from Republican Swing

Recount

It was widely reported that a recount was expected after the results were certified on November 25, 2013. According to the Virginia Board of Elections rules, as updated for the November 2013 election: "there are no automatic recounts. Only an apparent losing candidate can ask for a recount, and only if the difference between the apparent winning candidate and that apparent losing candidates is not more than one percent (1%) of the total votes cast for those two candidates."[27] This race is the second of the past three Virginia attorney general elections to go to a recount. In the 2005 race, Bob McDonnell won by 360 votes, with the result certified in December.[28]

Results

Virginia Attorney General election, 2013[5][10]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Mark Herring 1,105,045 49.91% +7.62%
Republican Mark Obenshain 1,104,138 49.87% -7.64%
Write-ins 4,892 0.22% +0.13%
Majority 907 0.04%
Turnout 2,214,075
Democratic gain from Republican Swing

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^ a b
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^ a b c
  6. ^
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^
  10. ^ a b
  11. ^
  12. ^ a b
  13. ^
  14. ^
  15. ^
  16. ^
  17. ^
  18. ^ Herring for attorney general The Virginian Pilot September 10, 2013
  19. ^ Virginia endorsements: Ralph Northam and Mark Herring The Washington Post October 15, 2013
  20. ^
  21. ^ Chase endorses Obenshain Star-Exponent October 5, 2013
  22. ^ Mark Obenshain snags endorsement of former Newport News senator Marty Williams Daily Press September 10, 2013
  23. ^ Obenshain endorsed by former AG candidate PilotOnline.com February 15, 2013
  24. ^ Editorial: Obenshain for AG Richmond Times-Dispatch October 20, 2013
  25. ^ For attorney general: Obenshain The Richmond Times October 30, 2013
  26. ^ Obenshain: The experience to solve problems Richmond Times-Dispatch October 24, 2013
  27. ^
  28. ^
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.